Where Do We Go From Here?: Career progression (continued)

Amazing Stories logoThe next post in my continuing "Playing the Short Game" series marketing and selling short fiction at the Amazing Stories site is now up. This week, in part 29, I look at some of the paths a writer might choose for their short fiction career (or paths that your career might pick all by itself). And special bonus points for anyone who leaves a comment correctly identifying the inspiration for the title of this week’s post. You can check out the earlier posts in the series at this link on the Amazing Stories site.

Playing the Short Game: Parts 24-28 are now up

I'm a tad behind posting updates about the blog series that I'm writing at Amazing Stories on how to market and sell your short fiction--and more. I'm now dealing with a another set of topics on what can happen (and what you can make happen) after you've started to sell your stories.  Here's an update on the latest posts over the recent weeks:

  • Part 24 – Let the Band Ring Out and the Banners Fly: To promote or not to promote
  • Part 25 – A Writer’s Magic Bakery: Selling your stories again (and again, and again…)
  • Part 26 – Bonjour / Hola / Ciao: Selling foreign language rights
  • Part 27 – Bonjour / Hola / Ciao: Selling foreign language rights (conclusion)
  • Part 28 – Cool Stuff That Might Happen (or Not): Awards, Best of Anthologies, Movies

Check them out and please feel free to leave comments or questions.

Updates to the FML

I've just posted an update to the Foreign Market List. Science Fiction Magazine in Denmark no longer accepts submissions in English (or any language other than Danish), citing difficulties in working with freelance translators.

They said WHAT!?: Dealing with reviews

Part 23 of my series on selling short fiction is up now at Amazing Stories. Well, actually it's been up since Saturday, but I'm a tad late in posting about it here.  This week, I deal with a good news / bad news aspect of publishing your first story…the ever anticipated, ever dreaded reviews. I cover what reviews really are, a safe way for beginners to deal with reviews of their first published story, how to do pull quotes, and why writers should never be reviewers. Check it out!

30% off from Kobo this weekend on my collections

Kobo has my two collections, IMPOSSIBILIA and CHIMERASCOPE, for 30% off this weekend. Use the coupon code SUMMER30. Here are the links to the two books if you're interested:

Chimerascope

Impossibilia

Enjoy!

Stephen Fry on grammar pedantry

This response by Stephen Fry to grammar police is wonderfully entertaining to listen to (and to watch for the animation), but more importantly, the message is one that all writers need to hear. Language is a living creature--it evolves, it grows, it changes, and we as writers, and especially fiction writers, should be the catalyst, the impetus, the drivers for that change.

But, but, but...you bought my last story: What your 1st sale really means

Part 22 of my continuing series on selling short fiction is up now at Amazing Stories. This week I talk about what to expect after you've finally made your first sale. Much to the surprise of many new writers, your first sale doesn’t guarantee that you’re going to sell the next story to the next market where you submit. It doesn’t even guarantee that the market that just published your first sale will buy the next story that you send them. Or any story you ever send them again. Read more about what your first sale really means here.

I Love Your Story. Now Change It: Working with an Editor

Part 21 in my ongoing series on marketing and selling short fiction just went up on the Amazing Stories site. This week's post completes the two-part discussion I began in Part 20 of working with an editor on getting your story ready for publication. In Part 20, I talk about why having an editor to work with is a good thing and discuss the different types of edits a story can receive. This week, in part 21, I finish off the editing topic with some tips on handling the editing process, and on deciding when to agree to suggested changes and when to politely say no. I also deal with the special situation of editing suggestions for a previously published story that’s about to be reprinted. Feel free to leave questions and comments at the Amazing Stories site. A complete list of my posts in this series is available here. Next week, I’ll talk about what to expect the next time you submit a story to a market that has just published you.

Chimerascope and Impossibilia on sale this weekend at Kobo!

Chimerascope coverIn Canada and the US, for today and tomorrow only, you can get both of my collections as ebooks for 30% off from Kobo. Just go to the Kobo pages that I list below and use the promotion code "SPRINGSAVE".

Kobo links:

Chimerascope

Impossibilia

Offer ends May 27. Enjoy!

Playing the Short Game: Part 19 is now up (contracts continued)

Part 19 of my continuing series on the business side of short fiction is now up at the new Amazing Stories site. This week, I finish off a mini-series on short fiction contracts. Parts 17 and 18 covered the following:

1. What rights are being requested?
2. When do those rights revert to me?
3. What legal liability am I being asked to accept?
4. What happens if the story is never published?

This week, I wwap up with the last four topics: 

5. What happens if this market folds or is sold?
6. Will there be a published declaration of my copyright?
7. What control will I have over changes to my story?
8. What am I being paid for these rights?

You can check out the entire series at this page.

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